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The Lying Mirror : The First-Person Stance and Sixteenth-Century Writing

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In recent years, discussion of first-person writing in the humanities and social sciences has been largely taken up with questions concerning the status of the 'self'. The objective of the analyses offered here—of sixteenth-century texts from France and the Low Countries, by Erasmus, Rabelais, Montaigne and several poets—is to speak about conceptions of first-person intentional action without posing the question in terms of the ontology of the self, its discovery or its prehistory. Questions of ‘selfhood’ can be more profitably rearticulated as those concerning intentionality and agency, what the text is for, and what its aims are. These problems can be raised without excessive attention to the evolution of a unified, self-conscious ‘self’ lying at the core of the first-person pronoun. In particular, disingenuousness and indirection—central concerns of this book—are fruitful concepts for thinking about textual agency and the ethics of the first-person stance.


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The Lying Mirror : The First-Person Stance and Sixteenth-Century Writing

The Lying Mirror : The First-Person Stance and Sixteenth-Century Writing

In recent years, discussion of first-person writing in the humanities and social sciences has been largely taken up with questions concerning the status of the 'self'. The objective of the analyses offered here—of sixteenth-century texts from France...

Write your review

Preface;
Note on the text;
Introduction;
The vocabulary of disingenuousness;
Methodological questions;
Sources for the 'self';
'Self' and 'ethos';

PART I : INTENTIONALITY, IDENTIFICATION, MEANING
At the window. Embodied intentionality
At the window
The inward glance Erasmus,Montaigne, andMartin Guerre (the ‘Alter Ego’);
What do friends hold in common?
‘Les hommes moitié les uns des autres...’
Martin Guerre
Lying and meaning: semantic intentionality
Intentio and meaning-intention
Meaning: problems in translation
Lying
Meaning what you say, saying what you mean. (Voluntas, sententia, mens, intellectus, sensus, etc.)
Excursus: A middle region

PART II : ON (NOT) MEANING WHAT YOU SAY
Aliud in pectore habens, aliud in ore: Erasmus and the habits of insincerity
Epistolary portraits
Polemic, friendship, and the open letter
Edward Lee
Invective, irony, allegory
‘J’entens, mais quoy’: Rabelais on reading, writing, and intending
‘Words in the air’: Thaumaste, Nazdecabre, and the question of perspicuous signs
‘Ce que j’entends par ces symboles Pythagoricques’: Rabelais on meaning and intention
Are Rabelais’s chronicles ‘anamorphoses’ or ‘steganographies’?
Who is the ‘I’ in early modern poetry?
Varieties of Renaissance poetic action
Lyric definitions
Problems of poetic action: Ronsard, Muret, Baïf
The death of the author: from Etienne Dolet to Clément Marot
The poet as phoenix: conclusions
Conclusion : ‘Faire semblant’
Bibliography

Title The Lying Mirror : The First-Person Stance and Sixteenth-Century Writing
Edition First Edition
By (author) James HELGESON
ISSN 1661-1950
Issue 14
Language anglais
Publisher Librairie Droz
Title First Published 06/1/2012
 
Format Paperback/softback
ISBN-13 978-2-600-01545-5
GTIN13 (EAN13) 9782600015455
Reference no. 200-14
Publication Date 06/1/2012
Nb of pages 336
Illustrations 4 illustrations
Dimensions 15.2 x 22.200001 cm
Weight 610 gr
 
Format Paperback/softback + PDF
ISBN-13 978-2-600-21545-9
GTIN13 (EAN13) 9782600215459
Reference no. 200-14-lot
Publication Date 06/1/2012
Nb of pages 336
Illustrations 4 illustrations
Dimensions 15.2 x 22.200001 cm
Weight 610 gr
 
Format PDF
ISBN-13 978-2-600-11545-2
GTIN13 (EAN13) 9782600115452
Reference no. 200-14-pdf
Publication Date 06/1/2012
Nb of pages 336
Illustrations 4 illustrations
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